Orbiting Planet Sound


#1

Here’s my system:
LMS based HiRes Files (192/24), Squeezebox Touch
Chord 2Qute
PS Audio Gain Cell DAC(as preamp)
Bel Canto REF500S
Dali Menuet Speakers
Polk Audio Subwoofer

Whenever I play any classical music with the volume in the 40-50 range there is an accompanying sound with the file that is NOT there when I play other genres of music. The sound is just like that ambient noise Sci-Fi movies use when they show a planet or a ship orbiting a planet. Doesn’t seem like a hum or a hiss to me. What is this sound, is it a limitation of the equipment or an artifact of classical recordings? As example of a recording, I’m listening to this:

files are


What are you spinning right now?
#2

Having had some more time to consider this question, I would like to amend the music files in question to classical soloists who have been recorded in a “natural” space which is to say not in a recording studio.


#3

A recording studio is a natural space and many studios possess better acoustics, or at least equal, than many concert spaces, churches, etc.

Also, most soloists of any genre are recorded in a studio.


#4

My mistake. By “natural space” I was implying a traditional chamber music type space. A naive assumption on my part that comes from the sounds of the room that these recordings seem to feature.


#5

Chamber music is traditionally performed in small, intimate spaces, especially solo instruments. A studio replicates this perfectly.

What is it that you are trying to avoid? Any decent solo chamber instrument will be carefully recorded in an appropriately sized space. Those few recorded in large spaces are close mic’d to retain a sense of intimacy.


#6

Narrowed down the audio anomaly to the recording rather than the equipment by listening on another setup. At this point it’s just something I have to get used to. At first it was so conspicuous to the ear when the files were played at volume that I found it a bit distracting which was the genesis of the initial question. Didn’t expect to hear audio anomalies this significant on a high quality copy of a famously well recorded piece by a well known artist. I didn’t understand it at first and thought I might be hearing power lines or something similar but I’m over it now. My assumption at this point is that it’s coming from the microphones used at the original recording sessions or is otherwise a result of the choices made by the engineer at the session. Thanks to all for the patience and the help.


#7

I also hear it - I believe it is the ambient noise floor of the 1965 tape. You can hear it in between phrases when he is not playing - along with his breathing at times. You can also hear it abruptly stop between tracks. I also hear his fingers slapping the finger board. I also think I can hear him wearing wool trousers and an off-white cotton button down shirt. Okay, just BS’ing you on that last sentence… But maybe when I get Snowmass on my DSjr I’ll know more about his shoes for sure :wink:

PS - I’m listening to a 44.1/16 FLAC stream from Tidal that is supposed to be an SACD transfer.


#8

But tape noise is a consistent hiss. The OP states it is not a hum or a hiss, but rather sounds like part of a Sci-Fi soundtrack.


#9

I think that’s what he means. It sounds like being on board the Death Star. It’s just the noise floor of the tape that abruptly stops for a split second between tracks.


#10

EXACTLT!! Thank you. My copy is also derived from the SACD release. I found it really distracting initially. I had sought out a high quality recording to see what my modest system could do when supplied with an “ideal” recording. It’s also present on some other similar recordings as well. Now that I’ve gotten used to it I’m able to focus on the performance which is of course wonderful. Can you recommend a solo cello recording with sound quality that matches the performance? Doesn’t have to be Bach.


#11

Regardless of the tape noise floor, this is probably as close to an ideal recording as you can get. The performance does sound fantastic but I am not an expert in these things. Every tape transfer to digital will have a tape noise floor. Consider it ‘character’ - like gray hair :wink: You can probably find a modern digitally recorded version - I find this site useful for recommendations on both the performance and recording: https://classicalcandor.blogspot.com/2009/09/basic-classical-collection-on-compact.html


What are you spinning right now?
#12

Here’s a high quality modern recording. It’s very energetic and well reviewed. Offered as an example to anyone who happens to read this thread and is interested in hearing a modern example of a high quality recording. Vivaldi: The Four Seasons - Janine Jansen


#13

This version is excellent as well.