Using the DirectStream Junior to stream?


#1

I’ve got a DS Jr. on the way and am wondering if there’s a way to run Spotify ON IT or THROUGH IT (aside from using AirPlay, I’m Mac-based)

I’ve auditioned Deezer, Tidal, Apple Music but prefer Spotify (even though it’s only max 320mps, and even that stat is overblown).

Yes, I’ve looked at the links here and elsewhere (http://www.psaudio.com/forum/need-help-ask-alex-the-psa-expert/stream-tidal-or-spotify-to-bridge/) but I’m not clear on whether or not I’ll be able to use the DS Jr. in conjunction with Spotify in some way.

BTW, I previously auditioned the Cambridge 851N but wasn’t crazy about the sound. I do love the sound of PS dacs.

So in this less than perfect situation, how to proceed? Could use a Cambridge CXN and then run the signal to the DS Jr.?

I know ROON is coming to the DS soon (and hence, the high quality sound of TIDAL) so maybe that’ll be the path – but still prefer surfin’ around on Spotify.

Aaaannnyhoooo…

Thanks for any helpful comments guys!


#2

Not that it’s an answer to your question, but just in case you didn’t know it: the DS Jr has exactly the Bridge II embedded in it, so anything that talks about the Bridge II applies to the Jr.


#3

Thank you sir, I’ll clean my glasses for a second look.


#4

One thing you can try is Jamcast, it will stream any audio on a Windows machine to a bridge.

Dennis


#5

I haven’t tried Spotify, but I am currently listening to an internet radio station through a USB connection to a DS Jr. Go to Control Panel> Hardware and Sound > Manage Audio Devices> Playback, and set the PS Audio DAC as the default audio output device. Note that you will have to load the PS Audio USB driver from our website.


#6

I’m on a mac and while I use the bridge 2 and jriver I also have a long optical cable from the Mac to the DS for live concert streams, etc. At some point jriver will hopefully add the feature they have for pc where it can grab any audio from a bowser or app and send it over ethernet


#7

Thanks guys, amazing to get responses from, among others the Director of Engineering of PS Audio! I love this company.


#8

I will second PJ’s comment. PS Audio’s high level of activity and communication with the users in this forum makes it hard to not like the company and its products.

This is something that other companies would do well to learn. I have one in mind that makes excellent sounding products but their communication with their users could hardly be any worse than it has been over the last few years. I have one of their better DACs and is sounds great - easily besting the NuWave DAC. I have been an active contributor on their forum and a strong supporter of the company, even in tye face of long delays in product delivery and lousy communication that has soured many who are still awaiting delivery of their products. Alas, while I still love the DAC and am patiently waiting delivery of their digital music server and portable digital audio players that I backed in their indiegogo campaigns (two years ago), I too am becoming disillusioned with the company. I still believe that the owner and lead designer is an honest and good hearted man, but the company that he has built has suffered badly from their aggressive marketing and poor communication. In recent months the communication has gotten better, as the owner / head designer has taken over communication and his voice seems to bear far more trust than anyone else in the company, particularly their (ex) head of marketing.

Sorry for the long story, but it is an indicator of the power that poor or excellent communication can have with the user base. I am happy that PS Audio can serve as such an excellent example in this respect. Thank you Paul for being a great leader and smart businessman.

J.P.


#9

Here, here! And I should add that not only the Dir. of Engineering responded to my question but the man himself Mr. Ted Smith responded (and within the hour!). Just the best, thanks again.


#10

Thanks guys your words mean a lot to us. I imagine Wingsounds13 must be referring to Light Harmonics? They are certainly nice enoughb people that I have met at shows and they seem sincere enough in their desire to make good stuff.

We’ve just always believed in our customers and put them first, before anything else. This has been both good and bad for the company, but it’s a policy that’s so deeply ingrained in the company’s fabric it’s just the way it’ll continue to be. Though, I think perhaps Ted and I may be the only two people in the company that answer emails 7 days a week. surprised-014_gif


#11

Your words mean a lot too. You, Dennis, Ted, BHK, everyone. This culture of communication with the customer is potent and is a powerful tool to strengthen the bond between the customers and the company. Simply witness the posts of a number of disgruntled customers in this forum and their rapid change of attitude when they get a quick response from the president of the company, engineers and/or designer of the product. This change is priceless in that it diffuses a bad situation along with the likely negative word of mouth and even the possibility of a return customer from one who otherwise probably never again buy a product from PS Audio.

Sorry Paul, it is not Light Harmonics - rather their down market brand of LH Labs. :slight_smile: Larry certainly does seem to be an earnest and honest man with a passion for giving his customers the best sounding equipment that he possibly can. This dedication to quality has been a double edged sword for them. Larry’s desire for perfection is admirable but has also been a contributor to significant product delivery delays. I have no doubt that they intend to deliver, and that what they do deliver (with the exception of their Verb IEMs) will sound fantastic. Certainly the Pulse X infinity that I have sounds great. I wish them luck and a long (corporate) life.

J.P.


#12
Paul McGowan said We've just always believed in our customers and put them first, before anything else. This has been both good and bad for the company, but it's a policy that's so deeply ingrained in the company's fabric it's just the way it'll continue to be.
Interesting comment. I'm not sure in what ways PSA's corporate culture could be bad for the company, but I'll take Paul's word that it has occasionally been so. But long-term it could be nothing but good for reasons that wingsounds13 expressed very well.

I had heard of PSA for many years before buying a PWD + Bridge a few years ago. I was pleased with the sound, of course, but even more impressed by what I saw in this forum. I’ve upgraded to a DirectStream and added an NPC and a P5 and am contemplating a BHK 250 as my next major purchase. I’ve had experience with companies whose products sound good but who aren’t there for the customers when needed. So call me a convert to PSA.


#13

77_gif


#14
magister said
Interesting comment. I'm not sure in what ways PSA's corporate culture could be bad for the company, but I'll take Paul's word that it has occasionally been so.
Most likely bad for the bottom line. Paul has been very kind to me and I'm sure many others ...

#15

Indeed. They have been very generous over the years, starting long before I (or anybody else) was a community leader. That’s the way to get loyal customers. Worked with me.


#16

Thanks guys.

Our company’s always been an odd mix of traditional models of customer/dealer relations. Most companies tend to put their dealers first because they are the ones dealing directly with the customers and they are the ones the company sells their goods to. Have a problem? Go see your dealer - you bought it from him. That has never been our model - that attitude has never made sense - and it’s at times gotten us in hot water with dealers and yes, affected the bottom line in both good and bad ways.

Mostly good for long term growth, not so good for short term gains.

From the day Stan and I started this company (back in prehistoric times) we were always customer centric. Dealers were an adjunct that helped us reach customers. While we love our dealers, (most of them anyway), we love our customers more and worked hard at maintaining a link between us and the customers - often times pissing off a few dealers in the process. And certainly a few customers too.

We watched over the years as many dealer-centric companies shot past us economically, while we muddled along, remaining loyal to our customer-centric model. With few exceptions each of those shooting star companies came and went, like bright embers popping out of a fire, to slowly burn out and turn to lumps of charcoal, or pale shadows of what they once represented–while we slowly grew.

I can’t say our model is superior but I can say that I, and every one of the 32 people that make up our family owned company, sleep better at night knowing who we serve.

Dealers and customers come and go. I’d sooner have our conversations with, and pour our resources and hearts into, end users and the products that make their lives better.

It’s just in our DNA.


#17
wingsounds13 said Sorry Paul, it is not Light Harmonics - rather their down market brand of LH Labs. :-) Larry certainly does seem to be an earnest and honest man with a passion for giving his customers the best sounding equipment that he possibly can. This dedication to quality has been a double edged sword for them. Larry's desire for perfection is admirable but has also been a contributor to significant product delivery delays. I have no doubt that they intend to deliver, and that what they do deliver (with the exception of their Verb IEMs) will sound fantastic. Certainly the Pulse X infinity that I have sounds great. I wish them luck and a long (corporate) life.

J.P.


JP, I think the one major mistake Larry makes is that, being a typical engineer, always looks for ways of making things “better” and, unlike Paul, rapidly loses focus when concentrating on too many different products at the same time. It takes dedication to pay attention to only one or two products, get them out the door and earning income before moving on to the next product. You can have 50 great products “in the pipeline” but if none is ready to sell your cash flow suffers quite a lot. And that’s where LHL is at right now.

The good thing is that they are very conscientious, so I don’t know if you got the email for the Verb IEMs that were going to be replaced with an entirely new model after the Verb production units did not meet their original design spec and the manufacturer sold the technology to other companies. So those of us who backed the original will get the replacement design for only the cost of shipping. But it was a distraction that delayed development of the portable player that was supposed to outshine Pono but has been delayed a couple of years.

But I learned after the Indiegogo campaign for the portable palyer that I shouldn’t spend another dime on any LHL product through a crowdfunding campaign until their order list from previous campaigns has been actually delivered. . . .

I would never think even for a nanosecond about doing that for a PS product whatsoever.

–SSW


#18

Agreed. Larry may have a great ear and design chops, but he is not (yet) a good project manager. While I might buy more products from LH Labs, I too will take a more reserved approach with them. On the other hand, when I have the funds I will be happy to buy more from PS Audio. I see a DS DAC in my future, unless its replacement is out by then… :slight_smile:

J.P.


#19
Paul McGowan said We watched over the years as many dealer-centric companies shot past us economically, while we muddled along, remaining loyal to our customer-centric model. With few exceptions each of those shooting star companies came and went, like bright embers popping out of a fire, to slowly burn out and turn to lumps of charcoal, or pale shadows of what they once represented–while we slowly grew.
Thank you for the insights, Paul. I also suspect that your model has (although you couldn't have foreseen this decades ago) put you in a better position now that so many brick and mortar stores have closed. Now that so many people have no local audio dealer, the dealer-centric model makes less sense than it might have in the past. I have been interested in a few products and been told that I had to contact a dealer since the company does not sell direct. But calling up someone halfway across the country, with whom I will probably never deal again, isn't my favorite way to do business. I'd be happy to patronize a local dealer if I could. So your model of dealing directly with customers and supporting dealers where possible seems like a good fit in today's climate, even if there are some uncomfortable in-between kind of moments.

Just one example: I was recently checking out speakers from a well-known but smallish company. Their website had no information about how to buy the products! There was no statement about whether or not they sold direct nor any dealer locator. I had to email them, which was silly. I did get a nice response, but there are no dealers in my area (New York City - Hudson Valley - southern CT, not exactly the middle of nowhere). So I did not pursue this brand.


#20

I do miss the dealer experience of going in and actually listening to different products. Sadly, my local dealer shut down a couple of years ago as they didn’t maintain a social media presence. Then people stopped coming in. (That and they did sour on a PS experience 20 years ago and never got over it. Their loss.) Yes the try-it-for-30-days is an alternative, but I liked the ability to go to the dealer, take several samples home, and pick the ones I wanted.

–SSW