Absence of noise

When do you start feeling like the very absence of noise on the signal is the sought after sound quality, instead of the noise-ridden variant?

I feel like this has become a trend…
And for good reason!

For me, I mainly suffer from this when having stimulated my perception of near-and-over ultrasonic frequencies by… externally induced assistance.
Still, I keep fretting over it even when sober…

A trend that pays off in spades…The more one eliminates noise from a system (especially ac noise) the more musical it becomes.

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It pays off, is interesting, and also annoying at the same time. I’m only in it for the music.

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And who is not…
I admit though, I compulsively listen to the noise just to recognise what should be absent.
There’s the thing, that it’s not an attribute that’s easily characterizeable on itself. It is after all a complex sum of every single conductive component in a given system.
Not what I seek per se… Would be nice to hear the music through all that haze sometime. Takes some money, I guess.

I do tend to prefer music with a lot of space in it these days - my wanting lots of overdriven guitars seems to have faded over the years!

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Noise and distortion are the enemies of audio fidelity!
Edit: They could be introduced by hadrware, software (recording / mastering etc.), or even listening space.

It seems like lowering the system noise or hash makes it possible to listen at lower volume levels without any loss of fidelity and for longer periods of time without being fatiguing…

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I think the same thing can be said about playing at higher volumes, too. Recordings that had been annoying at higher levels become detailed, interesting and non-fatiguing.

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But seriously, listening to the amount of noise on the played back signal, do you people do this?
Preferably comparing when possible, to its absense.

Now now, when consentratedly listening to noise, here’s a bonus: the music is still there (mostly)

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