How DEEP Does Your Bass Go?... are you sure?? (~;


#1

a 20 cycle note needs 56.5 ft wavelength to fully develop…a 30 cycle note needs 37.6 ft…40 Hz note needs 28.25 ft…a 60 Hz note needs 18.83 ft.

**source: http://www.mcsquared.com/wavelength.htm

(a calculator)

or snapshot below:

Wavelengths In Our Rooms

gotta love those harmonics though…

(~;


#2

In my case I don’t have a sealed room, behind the right speaker are two bass traps filling 3/5 of the doorway vertically, from the bottom. Near the back of the room on the right side I have an open doorway to the kitchen.

While my speakers specs are as I remember 16hz - 30khz +/- 2hz. Using a test record I have audible bass down to 25hz, it is down by more than 10hz, but considering the room I know what bass I have. The accuracy of the measurements is based on an SPL app, not calibrated, but I start at 1000hz at 80db. Even if it is off, I’m hoping the built in mic is flat, but if not with a test CD I can hear the 25hz tone, but not the 20hz.

Each speaker has three 12" woofers, they are ported, but I have the ports plugged, which is probably interfering with overall quantity of bass, but I prefer the tighter bass of the quasi sealed enclosure. In a different room with no treatments I had boomy bass. That is when I began to learn about room treatments, and proper placement.

If I ever come in to enough money to do my home repairs, or move to a better area, and home. I would buy either the Legacy Aeris or the Vandersteen 5A. Both have powered bass with lots of adjustability. Of course if by the luck of the lottery Gods, I would make point of hearing the Sonus Faber Aida. Amps would either be top of the line Coda, or BHK 300s.

Odds are I will die still owning my 1997 Legacy Focus, unless I end up in an assisted living home, then I might be forced to downsize to a headphone system. No idea there, as I am not fond of headphones. I have a pair of Grado 60 that sat in the box for so many years the foam ear pieces dried out and crumbled. I put new pieces on, verified that the Benchmark did work with phones, and haven’t used them since. I did have a pair of Koss sport phones that I used at the gym. I lost those in a break up. She used them more than I did, and when I asked for them back, she brought over some junk that weren’t mine, so I said just keep them.

Your chart doesn’t consider that the waves bounce around, or that you can get good bass out of expensive headphones. There is a lot more to it than the length of the waves, but it is an interesting chart.


#3
jeffstarr said Your chart doesn't consider that the waves bounce around, or that you can get good bass out of expensive headphones. There is a lot more to it than the length of the waves, but it is an interesting chart.
This. In a nutshell.

In fact, if length of open space limited frequency response, headphones would be good for frequencies exceeding 10,000Hz (the wave length of a 10,000Hz tone is 0.11 feet).