DSJ Subwoofer Placement

#1

Just wondering how far a subwoofer needs to be from the DSJ without causing trouble? Can it be nearby, or is it better 6’ or more away?

#2

And what sort of trouble might you be anticipating?

#3

Again, what sort of trouble are you thinking of? Are you considering microphonic resonance or electrical interference issues? If you turn the damn volume down below ear bleeding levels (dad talking to kids) microphonics shouldn’t be a problem. Electrical interference can come from all sorts of sources, which could be an issue with poor grade components or lousy home wiring.

Have six power cords in use for the audio system and three subs, two are 6 feet away from my DSJ, no problem (but use XLR to front subs and monitors, use RCA to my rear sub, no speaker cables). BTW believe strongly in carefully distributed bass to reduce inescapable in-room bass peaks/dips.

#4

The DSJ is not especially prone to vibration problems manifesting in the audio signal so I wouldn’t worry too much about placement.

#5

I’d be using rca connection. I have some good quality 3’ rca cables. Just wondering if I need to order 6’ ones. It’s a small room, those are the two distance choices.

I’m mostly concerned about hums and unclear if rca cable and having the sub so close matters.

Thanks.

#6

You should be more concerned about putting the sub-woofer in the room where it works best. Not 3 feet away from whatever you’re connecting it to simply because you already have a 3 feet long RCA.

#7

Yes, that makes sense. I only have two spots for it. 3’ or 6’ away. Just wondering if need to order a 6’ RCA because of some hum related issue (or something else) due to having the sub only 3’ away…

#8

You will need to order a 6’ RCA if it turns out that is the better position for it than the 3’ position. Otherwise, there shouldn’t be anything else to worry about.

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#9

If only one sub, try putting it in a back corner as far away from the mains as possible (and play with inverting phase) to best deal with in-room peaks and dips. I have 30 ft long RCA connection to my 3rd sub with no problems.

#10

Thanks, my room is relatively small and unfortunately the only spot is to the right or left of the rack between it and the main speakers.

Anyone have suggestions for a good Tidal track to tune the sub with?

#11

Tuning by ear is fraught with inaccuracies. Recommend getting REW (free) or Dirac (easier but not free). Also requires use of a calibrated USB microphone.

#12

I think Paul recommends doing it by ear vs instruments in one of his videos.

#13

By ear is perfectly fine, adjust to taste.

The settings end up as a compromise in any event. Thus, all that matters is if it sounds good to you.

#14

That sounds like wishy-washy talk to me, not audiophile speak. IMO real audiophiles seek high fidelity, which has to have a reference in the truth based on logic and measurements. Too many take the subjective approach too far and end up with crap sound, get sucked repeatedly into crap gear/setups, and follow a never ending willy-nilly path of constant aimless wondering that feeds the fluff industry.

#15

You make that sound like a bad thing.

#16

Everything with audio is subjective. Every recording is artifice. What sounds good to you may well be “crap sound” to another. Thus, the incredible variety of source and amplification components, and especially speakers - all of which sound vastly different.

“Real audiophiles” serve the music, not measurements.

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#17

Real audiophiles serve ‘real’ music, not whatever the listener thinks the music should sound like.

#18

I serve puerile rubbish music and it still sounds real good to me.

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#19

But what is “real” music? No recording captures the actual sound of an acoustic instrument. Even more problematic, recorded rock and other pop music have no counterpart in the physical world; there is no way to determine what sounds “real.”

And we have all heard equipment which measures superbly, but sounds dreadful. Properly applied, measurements can be a tool, but are not the end goal for many (most?) of us.

Listening to and enjoying music is ultimately a wholly subjective experience. Slavishly serving measurements is anathema to art. That is, I listen to music, not to measurements.

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#20

Agree that amplified music has no standard in the physical world. So being an audiophile I listen almost exclusively to classical and jazz. And it’s true that there is no perfect recording or playback of a performance. But beyond choosing what music we purchase, audiophiles have no control over the recording process.

Agree also that measurements are only a tool, not an end in itself. Measurements and understanding how sound is reproduced are methods in framing the minimums in how the system should perform such as frequency range, ultimate output, frequency response, and dynamic range.

Artists take their work seriously. Would a guitarist not tune his instrument? Would a painter not carefully mix his colors? Would a dancer not coordinate her steps with the music? Would an actor purposely mess up his lines? No, they are all perfectionists. Should not we as the audience take care in how their art is presented to us?