Interesting Articles

In the uk we have advert free radio stations that broadcast and stream in pretty good quality.
Makes quite the difference I think :slight_smile:

1 Like

Do people still listen to AM/FM broadcasts?

And if someone is streaming a radio station, they could do the same from a streaming service, no?.

1 Like

Probably 60-70% of my casual/background music is NPR Classical music via my NAD FM Tuner. I also listen to classical via Idagio, which does pay performers.

5 Likes

Interesting to me.
I guess I kind of understand listening to the radio in the background. And in the car, for short trips.
But I do not normally drive a car (I ride a motor scooter) so my radio exposure time is pretty much nil.
When I do drive in a car, I am such a channel hopper. As soon as a song comes on that I do not like or the seemingly never ending, commercials, I am on to the next station.

At home, I would rather play something that I own or stream from a streaming service, even for background.

Like I said, interesting to me to read what other people do.
Thanks for your reply!.

1 Like

Same here. Wife loves country… so we listen to that station, but lately have been using iHeart app.

1 Like

iHeart is a radio streaming app, yes?
If so, then not traditional broadcast radio?
And you use it in the car?

It’s a free streaming app. Has different channels. There are a few country ones wife likes. Yes in car and at home sometimes like outside. I don’t have much saved in roon for her country. So she just does that.

1 Like

In the car it’s almost exclusively local over the air NPR station WUNC or WCPE classical. Life is too short for commercials. At home back ground music is split between WCPE and KDFC San Francisco over TuneIn. So most of my casual listening is over the air broadcast stations that also stream.

2 Likes

BBC Random Numbers
“The Search For The Random Numbers That Run Our Lives”

4 Likes

A fascinating article. I especially found the bit about the Russian hacker who had people film a slot machine in action - ingenious. To think that that person was actually able to determine the machines predictability, and then hack it, was both admirable and disturbing.
A quick jaunt over to the Random.org site was like falling down a rabbit hole of ‘randomness’. :wink:
Kewl story.

1 Like

This story struck me for two reasons:
I had just been viewing online digitized NYC mid-19th century documents, which, for all their everyday bureaucratic mundaneness, were quite interesting in their now forgotten calligraphic beauty.
Also, my best friend, an artist who made his living as a calligrapher and illuminator, had the most intriguing style of long hand and always “wrote” letters, rather than type them.

For those of you who are voracious readers, there is a sizable mention about authors, scientists and historical personalities with regards to thier penmanship.

2 Likes