Setting up a Bridge II with a network and Roon


#1

This is my first post, so please bear with me. I recently purchased a DirectStream with Bridge II and a SynologyDS216J NAS (maybe not an adequate choice). I am clueless as to how to get everything running and listen to music.

I have the Bridge and NAS connected to my router and I think I have Synology’s DSM installed on the NAS. I want to avoid having to run my main computer to listen to music, just run Roon from my iPad through the NAS.

Do I need to drag and drop every song on every album individually to Synology’s File Station or is there a way to load everything at one time?

Secondly, I dragged and dropped Roon into File Station, but unless I have my main computer on, Roon won’t find my Bridge.


#2

Welcome!

I do not have a NAS so I am of no use, but someone should be along in a bit to assist.


#3

I am a longtime Synology user (like you, I don’t enjoy having to run my main computer to listen to music). I’m not (yet) a Roon user but I did investigate what it would take to get it on a NAS a few months ago.

The first thing you need to do is create shared folders on your Synology to store your music. You can use whatever organization makes sense to you. For instance, I am mostly a classical music listener so I have four folders for classical music (classical_A-F, classical_G-M, etc.) and other folders for rock and folk. The main thing is that these must be shared folders; creating a shared folder in Synology is different than creating a normal folder.

Log into your Synology, open File Station, and choose Create/Create New Shared folder and follow the prompts.

I assume that you have your music files on a computer, probably stored by artist and album. Once you’ve created all the shared folders you want, you can copy these music files onto the NAS. You probably can drag and drop them, or you can go into File Station and use the Upload function. You certainly can do bunches of them at once, not one at a time. The individual folders don’t have to be shared (i.e., if ‘rock’ is a shared folder, you can create folders within it using Create/Create Folder); dragging/dropping or uploading folders from a computer into ‘rock’ will be fine too, since folders created that way are normal (not shared).

If you cannot drop and drag from Windows Explorer or the Mac Finder, the issue is almost certainly one of permissions. Windows or Mac OS may want you establish some login credentials the first time you access the Synology this way. It’s been a long time since I went through this so details are hazy.

Getting Roon on a NAS is not simple. I suggest getting your music in place and making sure that you can play it to the Bridge using a normal UPnP control point before tackling Roon. To do so, you need a server installed on your NAS. Synology makes one called Audio Station that you can install through the Package Center. Audio Station is not, IMO, the best server for Synology (that honor goes to MinimServer), but since you are new to this let’s keep it simple. Install Audio Station and then get a control point app on your iPad. Mcontrol is a good one (or is it mconnect?? I can never remember the difference between those two, which are made by the same company! Somebody remind me.). Audio Station should be visible as a server in the control point; choose it and also tell mcontrol to play to the Bridge, not to the iPad. At this point you should have music.

To meet your goal of not running your computer while playing music using Roon, you must install the Linux version of Roon onto the Synology. If you have Roon on your Mac, dragging it onto the Synology does not accomplish this. Roon suggested (last time I checked, 2-3 months ago) a SSD in the NAS in order to get acceptable performance from the Roon database; storing music files on spinning discs is good enough. You need to go to the Roon site for the download you need and specific instructions. Unless you have a specific reason for using Roon, you may find that using a server on the NAS plus a control point is all you need.

Let’s get you going with Audio Station and then tackle Roon. Come back with more questions.


#4

Roon on a NAS is tricky. Not only do you need an SSD (recommended for performance), you need a fairly robust CPU in the NAS to handle the processing. Roon has minimum specs on their web site, but I believe at least an i5 is recommended. Not that many NAS have an i5, so there is a good chance your NAS is under-powered. You can still do this by putting your music on the NAS as descibed above but then using a headless Linux server like the SonicTransporter to run the Roon server. But you don’t really need Roon to to stream to the Bridge, as described above.


#5

Thanks for the useful advice. I’ll give these things a try. I started to look into JRiver since it’s DLNA and PS Audio has set-up instructions.


#6

You also need 4gig memory on you NAS to allow for Crieke’s Roon install. If you have 2gig it may work with a small library, but then you should throw out the apps you don’t use. I was one of the first running it on my Synology 713+


#7

If you want to run computer- and NAS-free, try BubbleUPnP on any Android tablet. It delivers good sound thru the Bridge, integrates with Tidal, and the price is right.


#8

Bubble UPnP is in fact the best of the control points I’ve tried – and that’s a lot of them, although not quite all. The OP said he uses an iPad, though, so I didn’t mention it.


#9

+1 for BubbleUPnP. Works great on my Motorola Droid Turbo smart phone running Andoid v6.0.1, and it is the only control point I have tried with the Bridge II that gets gapless playback right consistently.


#10
magister said

Getting Roon on a NAS is not simple.

I think this is about where someone should point out, that not only is it not simple - it's not supported. So when it breaks, there's a lot of good people at the Roon forum that will try to help. But it's highly unlikely that you'll get any help from Roon.

#11

Roon offers download packages for Roon Server for both QNAP and Synology x64 models, but these are considered unsupported?


#12
magister said

Roon offers download packages for Roon Server for both QNAP and Synology x64 models, but these are considered unsupported?

That is partially correct.

I just went out and checked, and was surprised to see that they do indeed list it on their download page. However, before seeing that I’d have sworn that NAS’s are not supported, but just included because there is such a high demand for it.

AFAIK Roon NAS support comes primarily from a very knowledgeable and helpful community member. Roon only gets involved if there is a problem with the Linux version of RoonServer software that runs on the NAS. If the NAS install is not working right - while the RoonServer is OK - then they don’t get involved. Or that’s my understanding anyway.

Here’s a link to the QNAP/Symbology subforum in their RoonSoftware forum. I’d strongly suggest anyone post a query there to see if said support is official, before investing a lot of time in a NAS install. If someone from Roon (as identified by the Roon logo as their avatar) comes forward with an affirmative, I’ll be both surprised, and apologizing for spreading dis-information.


#13

After posting the above, I’d like to clarify that I cannot speak to what Roon will - or will not - support. But I can tell you what I’ve observed, and that I’ve done.

Technically speaking they support their software on supported operating systems. And the RoonServer IS INDEED supported on Linux. However, when it’s running under a NAS things get a little more abstracted than just running it under a clean Linux build. You will find - as has been mentioned in this thread - that they do make hardware recommendations. So I’d look real hard at those before loading it in a NAS, for those recommendations are - AFAIK - based on the assumption that the device is doing little else but running Roon.

And just to put the cherry on top of the question, and going a shade OT… they’ve come forward stating that ROCK (the Roon appliance, that runs on NUCs) will be out soon. Were I looking to set Roon up now, I’d personally wait for ROCK, and install it on a NUC that Roon recommends. That’ll not only work great, it’ll sound great, and it’ll be supported like crazy by Roon Labs.


#14

I think post #7 above and now this one belong in the other thread – Elk, could you move them?

scolley said So I'd look real hard at those before loading it in a NAS, for those recommendations are - AFAIK - based on the assumption that the device is doing little else but running Roon.
Good point. In my setup, the NAS is mainly for audio and even for Word documents etc. I'm the only person who uses it. Upon reflection I can imagine scenarios where the demands on the NAS would be much more substantial.
they've come forward stating that ROCK (the Roon appliance, that runs on NUCs) will be out soon.
Thanks, I had not heard about this. I need to replace my NAS in the next six months or so and will consider the option of a NUC if I want to get serious about Roon.

#15

When ROCK comes out, and the folks at Roon say that’s very soon, IMO it’s going to be the Roon core platform of choice. The folks at Roon Labs built their own Linus OS - they call RoonOS - to run RoonServer on. And they optimized it to run on Intel NUCs. So install the RoonOS and Linux RoonServer on one of Roon Lab’s recommended NUC’s and you’ll have a ROCK (Roon Optimized Core Kit).

Not only do you know it will be fast (because the OS is optimized for the NUC platform), but it’ll sound great AND it’ll be uber stable. Why? Because ROCK has no GUI (it’s headless), and you can’t even RDP in for a command line, because they don’t give out the root password. So there’s no way in, no way to break it. IMO ROCK is an appropriate name. For it will be a set-it-up-and-forget-it Roon appliance, and solid (stable) as a rock.


#16

As with any such promised product, whether it lives up to its preexistence marketing claims remains to be seen.


#17

Indeed. wink


#18

Placing a product in the grubby hands of the general public is always the ultimate test.


#19
scolley said
magister said

Getting Roon on a NAS is not simple.

I think this is about where someone should point out, that not only is it not simple - it's not supported. So when it breaks, there's a lot of good people at the Roon forum that will try to help. But it's highly unlikely that you'll get any help from Roon.
I'll have to disagree.

1 It is very simple to install. Just follow this link. https://blog.rieke.tv/roon-server-on-nas/

2 It is supported.

I have it running stable and without a single hick-up on a USB3.0 connected SSD to the QNAP TVS-471 (Intel-i5 processor) since January. This is the NAS that is recommended by Roon. It is using less than 15% of the processor capacity.


#20
Cable-guy said
2 It is supported.

That’s a great quote. Thanks for that. IMO that language is a part of what leads to the confusion of “support”. I don’t believe that statement represents a commitment from Roon Labs to support RoonServer on NAS’s. Instead I think it represents something subtly different…

As I understand it, Roon supports the execution of their software on various operating systems. Nothing else. They do not support platforms. That should change when ROCK is released, when platform support will likely extend to those model NUC’s that that are recommended for ROCK, as long as the NUC is running ROCK. But for now, they just support software. So what does that mean for NAS’s?

They are “supportive”. They have created a subforum where people can share info, ask questions, seek help, etc. They have worked with Chris Rieke to help him get an install package for RoonServer for Linux software working on a couple of NAS platforms. But Chris does not work for Roon, nor have an contractual relationship with them as far as I know. If you feel that constitutes support by Roon, so be it.

I’ve got one of the NAS’s that Chris’ install packages work for. And when he was working on some improvements to the package, we discussed using me as a test user. When I asked him about what would happen if the package did not work correctly (it was being tested, after all), and left my NAS in less than a pristine state. He did not say, “The smart guys at Roon Labs will straighten it out for you.”. Nor did he say “The folks at Roon Labs will work with you to fix it.” In fact, he didn’t even say, “I’ll help you straighten it out.” Instead, he let me know that any kind of repair would be up to me.

So if your RoonServer Software for Linux does not work on your Linux based NAS. Roon Labs will support that. But if the NAS has problems because of RoonServer, or if the install script fails, or if anything goes wrong with your NAS, you can ask for help on the forum. But - like me with the test installation - technically I believe you are on your own.

I hope that clarifies.