Klipsch cornwall speakers

I have always had a fascination with klipsch speakers from the beginning of my interest in listening to music, starting in the late 60’s. I’m in my 60’s now and am considering adding the cornwall to my system, the khorns & lascala are to big for my room. My desire for horn speakers has driven me to this and this why I’m asking for some critical constructive feedback. Please those who have them or have heard them, your experience would be a great help. I also need to find a place to hear them for myself.

Thanks
Mike

With Klipsch the best approach in my experience is to arrange for an audition and bring your amp. Should you like them next step is an in home audition. It will depend on what type of music you typically listen to. When I listened to Klipsch Cornwall IV they were too forward, among other things, for my taste. They were a clear step up from the Forte IV. Good luck in your search.

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I auditioned a pair of Klipsch RP600M’s year before last as I very nearly bought them.

They were certainly forward to the point I found them quite brash.

BUT, I have been advised by almost all Klipsch owners that any Klipsch really does require break in, and that forwardness greatly reduces over the first however many hours, and the become far sweeter.

I think a lot of the stigma may be related to that misunderstanding.

Not sure if @Dirk would corroborate that?

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I, too, owned a pair of RP600Ms and I didn’t get along with them. After watching online videos and reading rave reviews I bought a pair during the first lock-down. I run them 24/7 for 6 weeks and they did improve most noticeably, that being said, I didn’t hear anything special from them when A/B-ing the 600Ms against my Linn Kans MK1 and my Shahinian Super Elf’s. I found the 600Ms tilted up through the treble and hence tiring listening to them. I’ve since sold the RP600Ms.

Yes, the heritage speakers do need a lot of hours on them.! When I first played them stone cold they had a thin and weedy top & mid with not that much happening down below. Took weeks on a rollercoaster of good to decent sounding days - followed by days of disjointed, tuneless noise. They took about 6 weeks to stop changing - but there were some good days during the burn-in cycle.! I found the bass took the longest to arrive, there was a time during the burn-in when the bass was so lightweight if I had sat the bass driver outside the horn on the floor it couldn’t have been any worse. But, with extended burn-in, I have excellent bass from them now. L/S are very critical to positioning in that respect.

My other favourite speakers are Omni-directional and they are much easier to setup. Just pull them out into the room and away from the side walls and that’s about all one needs to do. Klipsch speakers are very different in that respect, and extremely sensitive when it comes to the setup and room positioning, relative to boundary walls, etc, etc.

I thoroughly enjoy them, I really do. But that’s just me, my take, others will not like them. But I could care less… :slightly_smiling_face:

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As an addendum to my question of purchasing CW’s, how many of you have more than one pair of speakers in the same listening room? How do you switch back and forth between the two? If I purchased the CW’s this is probably what I would do.

Thanks
Mike

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While not having a second pair of speakers in my listening room I have been told that applying a shorting strip to the speaker terminals will minimize the sympathetic driver interaction. I have not personally validated this claim, but you may find it worth experimenting with. If the speakers have a port, installing a plug may also be beneficial.

Well I’m taking the weekend to consider buying a pair of the cornwall’s. With a 60 day trial period from the vendor and a 10 year warranty by klipsch I’m pretty sure it will happen. Any comments?

I’m not a huge Klipsch fan historically but the Gen4 Heritage Series speakers up and down the line are really good. I think you will be pleased. I’ve demo’d the CW4 two or three times. Long thread on the speaker on Audiogon you might want to check out.

As long as they line up with your taste and mate well with your present electronics and cables. Either that or are part of a system rebuild there really is not much to say. Speaker selection is a rather personal decision tailored to the room and one’s sonic preference. It comes down to your near and long term listening goals.

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separate power amps for each speaker pair (i’m lucky that the two different pairs can sit happily in different positions so i don’t have to move them). then either a custom switcher or only switch one amp on at a time (or both to mix and match of course).

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I own two pair of speakers. Large monitors and floor standers. I’m a hair-shirt purist. When I want to switch I move the pair I want to listen to into position and the other pair aside. I switch my speaker cables to the pair I’m going to listen to. No duplicate electronics with the added complexity and definitely no shorting strips. I don’t care about the inconvenience of having to move speakers, just sonic excellence by keeping it simple. Oh, I do have tape on the floor to mark the optimal positions of the two pairs. Elimiinates having to reinvent the wheel every time I switch.

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I have three pairs of speakers in my listening room. Two pairs of speakers up front and a pair of Shahinian Obelisks at the back of the room. I use separate amplification for each pair of speakers. I have my own listening room complete with a workshop up in the loft. This set up keeps the wife happy, I can do as I like and make as much mess as a like without domestic unrest! I owned Cornwall IVs for a few months earlier this year, that I really liked, and that led me to buying the LaScalas. Too utilitarian and aesthetically unacceptable for WAF, but I like the anachronistic look when it comes to loudspeakers. :slightly_smiling_face: Only you can decide if the CW-IVs will float your boat, but I certainly liked them. Anyway, Good Luck with them.

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What are you driving the LaScalas with? Just curious…

Have not heard the LaScalas in a very long time. My impression when I did hear them was what a fun speaker. A rather imposing proposition based on size alone.

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Lascala’s are really not much bigger than Cornwalls. They actually appear smaller in person than Cornwalls, but are deeper

As I stated there is a 60 day return policy and return shipping is paid for by the vendor. This will give me enough time for break in and evaluate the sound compared to my current speakers. By the they are emerald physics kcii pro from underwood audio. I’m trying to get back to a more organic sound and believe horns will accomplish that. Also there is no pressure to sell the ep’s, I live alone and can indulge in my hobby. Retirement and divorce has been good for my peace of mind.

Mike

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Pretty!

The LaScala’s are 10 inches deeper than the Cornwalls. It has been a long time since I auditioned them. The dealer had Cornwall, LaScala, as well as Belle Klipsch. and Klipschorn I’m not certain but the Belle may have been discontinued. As they get bigger it seemed to me accommodating them in an average sized room could be tricky. I had kicked around the idea of Klipsch when pursuing an SET amp. Cornwall seemed to be the sweet spot for my space.

Pass Labs, Plinius, Rega Osiris – (4 off). I have a few tube amplifiers. I used to have BHKs Pre, 2 x 250s and 300s, but I replaced them with Pass Labs. I might use one make of amp for a while then decide hook up something else.

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