Seeking recommendation on upgrade of my P10


#1

My P10 runs at about 60% of capacity and powers everything in my system. It is about 3 years old and I have been pretty happy with it, but have been following your posts and the comments about the new ones. What are the trade offs between the P15 and the P20? My system is analog-centric, meaning it is optimized and the big money is invested in the vinyl source components: all tube electronics, 2 highend turntables, over $25K invested just in the vinyl playback stuff, vs. a Sony HAP-ZIES for digital. Maybe some day I will invest in PS Audio digital source stuff, but for a collector of vintage jazz it is really mostly not worth the effort.


#2

Doesn’t appear you have a problem that needs solving. Only way to tell if a P15 or P20 improves SQ to your liking is to try one. Downsides to a P20, it’s about 25% heavier to hump around vs. the P15.


#3

I never implied there was a problem. I asked a question.


#4

I’m sorry you didn’t find my response helpful. I thought I answered your question regarding the trade offs between P15 and P20.

To solve a problem that doesn’t exist is an expression, nothing more.


#5

Is your P10 running fairly cool @ 60% Bill? Maybe I’m over cautious but personally I like lots of headroom in a Power Plant. Mine is running at below 40% so I’m happy with that.
If, at 60%, your P10 is running on the hot side then (and I don’t care what anybody else says to the contrary) it’s lifespan has to be negatively impacted.
Of course - one reason to consider an upgrade to the P20, is the better sound quality. But to me, bringing the 60% down to 50% or perhaps lower would be a second good reason especially if my P10 was running on the hot side to begin with.
At below 40% I perhaps don’t have sufficient reason to upgrade but I’m gonna do it nevertheless :grin:


#6

It’s really not the capacity we’d want to focus on, it’s the level of performance you’d like. At 60% usage on your P10 (and it would be the same for a P15) you’re fine from a load standpoint. What would be an improvement is simply sound quality.

The P15 sounds noticeably better than the P10 and the P20 a major step up from both. It has to do with the new circuitry inside that offers so much better performance and lowered impedance.

If you can afford the P20 there’s no doubt your system would benefit and greatly from this upgrade.


#7

Thank you both for your help. For the record, my P10 does not run hot, rather it is functioning well within it’s capability. An amplifier, which is what these are really, is at maximum stress at approximately 1/3 power, but that was not my concern. From Paul’s explanation it sounds like I should order a P20. I wasn’t sure the difference between the P15 and the P20 would be as noticeable considering my principle listening is devoted to vinyl. I understand the differences would be more significant for digital sources, hence my question.


#8

Definitely. It’s an easy choice if you’re able. The P20.


#9

Should a dedicated 20 amp service replace the 15 amp circuit that I currently have? If so, should a separate ground be specified?


#10

I stayed with a dedicated 15 AMP circuit. The cost of running a new 20 amp circuit was exorbitant and there would be numerous points of wall and ceiling damage. This was even when we combined the cost with a new run of 50 Amp service to a new hot tub. I’ve never had an issue of capacity with 15 Amps dedicated service to two BHK 300’s and many periferals.


#11

I ordered a P20 last night. I will let you know how it sounds upon arrival and a listen. Thanks for your advice everyone!


#12

After experiencing a P15 in my system and hearing a P20 in a friend’s system, I believe Paul is absolutely correct in saying the P20 is a big step up from both the P10 and P15. BTW, I heard my friend’s system just two weeks before the P20 was installed - huge positive difference!


#13

Yup. P20 is killer.


#14

Should I expect to hear an improvement right out of the box or is there a breakin period to take into account? Also, I leave my P10 powered 24/7 and intend to do the same with the P20 in all likelihood. If the power is on, but there is no load, is any breakin occuring?


#15

You should hear improvement out of the box though there is certainly a break in period.


#16

Paul,

Change of subject, I just finished reading your blog and the reprint of John Atkinson on square waves in CD players and then the article in Copper Magazine on Hoagy Carmichael, one of my favorite composers. You are certainly doing a lot of wonderful things that enhance my life just at the moment. Thanks a million!


#17

Thanks! Appreciate the kind words and feedback. We’re doing our best to reach out and keep the dialog moving.


#18

Paul, how would a single P20 compare to two P15s,
with respect to component-to-component isolation (AC noise crosstalk / modulation), and overall sound quality? I’m currently using two P10s for my 2 x monoblock amps and 2 x powered loudspeakers to enjoy physical and electrical separation (via two dedicated AC lines/duplexes) between the L and R channels, as well as access to four High Power duplexes available from the two P10s.

Due to space allocations, I’m naturally considering upgrading to 2 x P15s, but an alternative configuration using a single P20 (physically placed in the center of my component rack) is also a possibility. Thanks in advance!


#20

What a gorgeous room! Love the diffusers behind the setup. RPG?


#21

Two P15s give better isolation and have distinct advantages over a single P20. That said, the P20 is still the better sounding of the two regenerators but the cumulative benefits of two P15s may outweigh the single P20 benefit. Hard to say in any one particular instance but given your situation as described I’ll bet the twin 15s might be the way to go. Either way would result in excellent results.