Something every guy should have


#1

I love to cook, but even if you do not, a great Caesar Salad recipe will be an almost sure way to impress the local natives.
This was from a famous Montreal restaurant called Le Fado that was famous for their C-Salad and wine cellar. I often invaded both their kitchen and cellar. Sadly, they closed when the owner passed a few years ago.
Experiment and adjust to your personal tastes but this is a great starting point.
Yum Yum

CAESAR SALAD FOR TWO

2 Medium Egg Yolks

1 Pinch of Black Pepper

2-3 Medium Cloves of Garlic (Crushed)

3/4 TSP of Hot Mustard

3-4 Fillets of Anchovy

8-10 Small capers

4-5 OZ of Olive oil

20 SMALL non-flavored croutons

A Dash of wine vinegar

FRESH Parmesan cheese(finely grated)

LARGE head of romaine lettuce

Wash & dry lettuce. When completely dry:break into bite size pieces-using only the darker ends of the lettuce.

In a large salad bowl add pepper, garlic, mustard, anchovy, and capers; with a fork crush into a single consistency. Now add egg yolks to mixture and whisk together. Adding oil at no more than

3/4 oz at one time, whisk until it thickens and turns whitish yellow in colour;

repeat until oil is finished.(real mayonnaise is made this way). Mix-in vinegar to taste-it is only there to add a slight tang.

Now throw in croutons and stir slightly letting them soak for a short period croutons should not be soggy.

Add lettuce, grate some Parmesan on top, then toss until lettuce is coated evenly with dressing

Serve on plates with Parmesan on the side.

If you have some fresh cherry tomatoes from your garden, they will add color as well as taste to your salad.

Enjoy!

Gordon


#2

Is is satisfying to see a Caesar which includes anchovy in the dressing. I am astonished home many “Caesar” salads at restaurants do not include anchovy (which is a must if you are not including Worcestershire, as with the above recipe) or egg yolk.

I suggesting coddled egg yolks, for the improved texture.


#3

Yah the recipe calls for 1 yolk per person basically.

Worcestershire, which I use often for other things, is a bit strong I think, in that it tends to color and veil some of the other tastes. 15_gif

This is a fairly traditional one and meant for the individual nature of the ingredients to shine through.

I do use Worcestershire in Bison meat [ or other very lean ground meat] hamburgers along with Sambal Oelek and get lotsa repeat requests. AND a bit of finely diced bacon mixed in takes it over the top if your guests are not Kosher practitioners.

One of our more recent exports to you yanks was our Canadian Bloody Caesar. Lotsa W-sauce is a must as well as a smidgen of horseradish [secret ingredient].


#4
Elk said

Is is satisfying to see a Caesar which includes anchovy in the dressing. I am astonished home many “Caesar” salads at restaurants do not include anchovy (which is a must if you are not including Worcestershire, as with the above recipe) or egg yolk.

+1, and
Gordon said

Worcestershire, which I use often for other things, is a bit strong I think, in that it tends to color and veil some of the other tastes.

+1!

I think the three of us could have quite a nice culinary meet. Would be even better with some audio thrown in.drinking-39_gifsmiley-music005_gif


#5

Worcestershire sauces typically contain significant anchovies. Thus, if this traditional ingredient is omitted, anchovies should be substituted.

Think English version of nam pla.


#6
gordon said

314 TSP of Hot Mustard

Woweee, Gordon you do like a lot of Hot Mustard! That Romain must be a swimmin in the hot stuff! Caesar salad is good stuff, I just like mine with a little kick.

#7
pmotz said
gordon said

314 TSP of Hot Mustard

Woweee, Gordon you do like a lot of Hot Mustard! That Romain must be a swimmin in the hot stuff! Caesar salad is good stuff, I just like mine with a little kick.


Thanks, I fixed it.

I have had that recipe for so long it was originally done on a typewriter. [remember those].

ELK.

I once visited a nam pla factory near Rayong while on my way to Koh Samui. FYI, the unsold and sometimes, unwanted, little fishes are left outside in vats with salt to ferment and then crushed with whatever is handy. The salt sucks up all the fish “water”. In spite of that vision, we seldom have a meal at home without Prik Nam Pla [ with presh chilies] as a condiment. I’m getting hungry just thinking about it.


#8

It is fascinating so many cultures have a fermented fish sauce, including the English, and often based on anchovies.

In Japanese cuisine, with which I am most familiar, it is used to impart umami, one of the five basic tastes and critically important to Japanese cooks.


#9

Does anyone want a good pork rib recipe?

Not a sweet one [ more garlic and chili based]. but great on BarB and with a couple of cold brews.


#10
gordon said Does anyone want a good pork rib recipe?

Not a sweet one [ more garlic and chili based]. but great on BarB and with a couple of cold brews.


Go for it!

#11

+1

I am not a BBQ type, but many are. Another good recipe is always welcome. It may additionally inspire other ideas as well.


#12

PORK RIB RECIPE

serves 4

41/2 lbs pork spare ribs

3 tbsp minced garlic

1 tbsp fish sauce [ the Thai one with the crab on the front is my preferred]

1/2 tsp garlic powder

11/2 tsp sugar

1 tsp black freshly ground pepper

1 tbsp rice wine or cooking wine [ sake if you can’t find the others.]

2 oz chopped Chinese parsley [coriander]

2 tbsp golden mountain sauce.

** check out your local oriental grocery store for supplies. That in itself can be a fun experience.

COOKING.

You can deep fry, broil in the oven or BBQ.

I like them a bit crispy which is a notch down from burnt.

Separate ribs and cut into pieces about 4 inches long.

Place minced garlic,fish sauce, garlic powder, golden mountain sauce, sugar, black pepper, wine and Chinese parsley in a mixing bowl, add ribs and stir till ribs are well covered. Place in the fridge and allow to marinate overnight.

After cooking they can be served on a platter with cucumber, tomatoes and lime.

  • If you like spicy you can add a couple of chopped fresh chilies or Sambal Oelek to the marinate mix.

Enjoy


#13

I love ribs of all kinds, but I think I have found the rib nirvana. It is at a restaurant called Amadeus in Antwerp Belgium. It is an all you can eat rib restaurant (with other dishes available) that has been in business for many, many years. They bring out a grilled rack of ribs plain with a slight seasoning, and then they have a warm molasses type syrup/sauce that you pour on top. I first had them back around 2005 and could remember the taste right up until I went back last week. They were everything I remembered. Very different from the usual BBQ’d ribs that you find throughout the U.S. and Canada. (Not that there is anything wrong with that. I’m sure I have plowed through a few hundred pounds in my time) 4_gif Heading back next week for another round…

Paul