Why turn a PowerPlant off?


#1

Hi all, first time posters, but long time lurker. I’m a French maker of full systems (ICOS Audio) and distributor for Antipodes Audio products.

A client has a P3 and tells me it is recommended to turn it off when he’s not using it?

At least for his Antipodes server, it’s a bad idea as they will only sound their best after three days of totally uninterrupted power. I wouldn’t be surprised if something similar was the case with his Auralic vega DAC. So he wins quality power with the Powerplant but loses most of the benefit by having to turn it off every night.

Is there a downside to using the '“always on” mode for one zone (say the one used for the server and DAC)? Why turn the PowerPlant off at all except maybe when you leave for long periods of time?

And another question: how good is the isolation between the different zones? In my experience computer audio is incredibly sensitive to the different plugs being used and I found that ideally, I want one power line for the server, one for the rest of the stereo, and that on top of that I prefer to have simple filters on electric “polluters”, i.e. router, computer, TV, washing machines, fridge…


#2
julot said Hi all, first time posters, but long time lurker. I'm a French maker of full systems (ICOS Audio) and distributor for Antipodes Audio products.

A client has a P3 and tells me it is recommended to turn it off when he’s not using it?

At least for his Antipodes server, it’s a bad idea as they will only sound their best after three days of totally uninterrupted power. I wouldn’t be surprised if something similar was the case with his Auralic vega DAC. So he wins quality power with the Powerplant but loses most of the benefit by having to turn it off every night.

Is there a downside to using the '“always on” mode for one zone (say the one used for the server and DAC)? Why turn the PowerPlant off at all except maybe when you leave for long periods of time?

And another question: how good is the isolation between the different zones? In my experience computer audio is incredibly sensitive to the different plugs being used and I found that ideally, I want one power line for the server, one for the rest of the stereo, and that on top of that I prefer to have simple filters on electric “polluters”, i.e. router, computer, TV, washing machines, fridge…


Very good question. I have two outputs on my P3 programmed as always on. The other two are connected to my mono amplifiers that have inaccessible power switches (on the back of the units, which are in a cupboard), so I effectively use the P3 remote to switch my amplifiers off and on. I’ve never had any issues with the sound, is good pretty much from switching them on.

#3

I also keep my P5 on pretty much all the time; I do use it sometimes to switch off power to my phone pre when I am not going to be using it for a while, and I shut it down just to be safe when there’s a nearby electrical storm, but other than that it stays on.


#4

Isolation is good, though not as perfect as if it had separate filters isolation each - or separate regenerators. Which it does not.

The output impedance of the Power Plant is several orders of magnitude lower than what comes out of the wall socket - and it’s very difficult, sometimes impossible, for connected noisy equipment to generate their noises because of this low impedance - and that’s the secret of the Power Plant’s isolation benefits.

If we would add filters, the high frequency isolation between units would be better, but the impedance would also be higher - thus it would be a trade off. What you have in the Power Plant is likely 90% better than any other scheme for isolation.


#5
julot said A client has a P3 and tells me it is recommended to turn it off when he's not using it?
I own a P5 and from somewhere -- I'm not sure just where -- I got the idea that one would normally leave a Power Plant on (turning off individual components like tube amps when not in use, of course, by switching off their outlets but not the PP itself). I'm not sure why your client got the opposite idea. I see that Paul has responded to this thread but he did not address the underlying issue. Who knows the real answer?

#6

I do as Bob does.

My understanding is that the Power Plants are designed to be on all the time, but there is zero harm in turning one off.


#7

Thank you all – I’ll advise the client to leave his P3 always on and discover the true potential of his system.

Paul, I take it it means keeping filters on the polluters (router, washing machine, etc. ) is still a good idea even when using a Power Plant for the stereo equipment. And I suppose the perfect solution would be dedicated lines and separate Power Plants for the various instruments, but we expect something pretty good from having all devices plugged to a PowerPlant.


#8

Yes, sorry I missed that. Leave it on. Longer life and better sound are your rewards.


#9
julot said Thank you all -- I'll advise the client to leave his P3 always on and discover the true potential of his system.

Paul, I take it it means keeping filters on the polluters (router, washing machine, etc. ) is still a good idea even when using a Power Plant for the stereo equipment. And I suppose the perfect solution would be dedicated lines and separate Power Plants for the various instruments, but we expect something pretty good from having all devices plugged to a PowerPlant.


It can help, though I have never found such things of great benefit. The Power Plant seems enough - though others may differ.

#10

Thanks again, and congratulations on such an user-oriented forum… and firm.


#11

Here’s a maybe stupid idea, but I think it would have some value: imagine if the Power Plant would also regenerate the ethernet signal and pass it on to the streamer/server/whatever computer audio source you have (in other words include a well-powered ethernet switch). Since that’s the other major source of noise, it would an elegant way to protect the system…