What is lowest output voltage can be set on P10


#1

Hi all P10 users,

I am moving from Tokyo back to LA, with quite a number of 100v equipment, thinking of buying a P10. As I can see its output voltage can be reduced, just wonder how low it can go ? Can it be 110v ? (100v will be too extreme, and I believe all my gears can handle 110v, 120v is really questionable)

Thx,

Cam


#2

Have you checked the ratings for your equipment (probably listed near the power inlet)? I would have thought that most would be built to handle both Japanese and US voltages in order not to have to change the power supplies given the relatively small variation between the US and Japan. But that’s just a guess.


#3

I think by law, electronics selling in Japan can only label 100v at the back, yet I know they can at least handle ± 10%


#4

That’s possible but would surprise me given that a lot of things these days have universal power supplies that handle 100-230V or so (e.g., Apple products; not so common on high-end audio equipment). It’s also impossible for an electric system to deliver exactly 100V (or any other fixed number) to all customers at all times so a range is provided in the US. Best way to find out is to look and/or contact the manufacturers. I’m pretty sure a P10 will go down to 110 and maybe lower but have not verified that.


#5

Is there any way to contact the technical staff in PS Audio regarding this lowest voltage that can be set ?


#6

Sure. General contact info is here: http://www.psaudio.com/how-is-ted-coding-the-fpgaact/

You might also try alex@psaudio.com or just give them a call. Calling is often faster.


#7

Thanks so much for the information.


#8
camt2005 said . . . how low it can go ? Can it be 110v ?
I believe it can be adjusted to as low as 105v, but this would be asking a great deal of the unit on a continuous basis. Perhaps Paul will jump in.

#9

That sounds correct but I don’t remember exactly. I will ask engineering to give me the correct answer.


#10

That sounds promising ! Hope that it will be a good news.


#11

I just confirmed on my P10 that it dials down to 105v.


#12
Lonely Raven said I just confirmed on my P10 that it dials down to 105v.
That's certainly a good news. Thanks for trying.

The next question is how you people normally get your PS Audio products from ? Local dealer ? Audiogon ? Thx.


#13

Thanks, Mr. Raven!

I buy my PS Audio products direct, or from a stocking dealer, depending on circumstances (pricing, availability, if I auditioned the product at a dealer I buy from them, etc.).


#14
Elk said Thanks, Mr. Raven!

I buy my PS Audio products direct, or from a stocking dealer, depending on circumstances (pricing, availability, if I auditioned the product at a dealer I buy from them, etc.).


From what I saw in Audiogon, it seems that the street price is a lot less than the list price, buying direct will be on list price, or I am wrong ?

#15

PS Audio would charge the list price, as would their authorized dealers (although there may be exceptions), unless they are having one of their periodic sales (which have had some negative impact on used equipment prices). I have not looked at Audiogon but if someone is offering new equipment at substantially reduced prices they are probably not an authorized dealer and you may not get the PSA warranty.


#16

To bring back an old thread…

What was the end result here? Can the P5/P10 run at 105V as a lower limit?

I had a bad affliction for loving vintage Luxman stuff, and want to plan my next upgrade to my system both on some Japan-only 100V stuff, along with proper power conditioning. Ideally, if the P5/P10 could output 100V, or close to it, that would be great. If it can’t, what is the proper way to do so? Have a step down transformer between the P5/P10 and the equipment? I wouldn’t want to invest in a quality piece of equipment like a P5/P10 and then undo all the good work by having a step-down transformer in the mix.

Or, I guess the alternate would be to have the step-down transformer feed a Japan-spec P5/10?


#17

Well I read above that the P10 goes down to 105v, that would work.

In the US when I was growing up, everything was referred to as 110v. I don’t know if that changed or we were normally getting close to 110v. My incoming voltage is usually 126v dropping at the most to 124v when we have really hot days and everyone’s running their AC.

I set my P300 to 120v for the 4 front end components plugged in to it, and run every thing else through the Dectet and Duet at the 126v.

I would think that the P10 outputting 105 would just make it’s job easier.


#18

It can do that and it’s fine. Also, most equipment can take more than nominal voltage as well.