Texas Talkin'


#1

> > 1. AS WELCOME AS A SKUNK AT A LAWN PARTY.

  Self-explanatory

  2. TIGHTER THAN BARK ON A TREE.
  Not very generous

  3. BIG HAT, NO CATTLE.
  All talk and no action

  4. WE'VE HOWDIED BUT WE AIN'T SHOOK YET.
  We've made a brief acquaintance but have not been formally
    introduced.

  5. HE THINKS THE SUN CAME UP JUST TO HEAR HIM CROW.
  He has a pretty high opinion of himself.

  6. IT'S SO DRY THE TREES ARE BRIBIN' THE DOGS.
  We really could use a little rain around here.

  7. JUST BECAUSE A CHICKEN HAS WINGS DOESN'T MEAN IT CAN FLY.
  Appearances can be deceptive.

  8. THIS AIN'T MY FIRST RODEO.
  I've been around awhile.

  9. HE LOOKS LIKE THE DOG'S BEEN KEEPIN' HIM UNDER THE PORCH.
  Not the most handsome of men.

  10. THEY ATE SUPPER BEFORE THEY SAID GRACE.
  Living in sin.

  11. WE'RE IN TALL COTTON.
  Things are going well

  12. AS FULL OF WIND AS A CORN-EATIN' HORSE.
  Rather prone to boasting.

  13. YOU CAN PUT YOUR BOOTS IN THE OVEN BUT THAT
  DON'T MAKE THEM BISCUITS.
  You can say whatever you want about something, but it doesn't
    change what it is.


>


#2

Nice! Though it’s not the same sort of thing, I like how in Houston they say, “How’s yer Mom 'n’em?” (Family is well?)

And that in Manhattan the street with the same name is pronounced “Howston”.

For you Brits, some in Texas pronounce it much like “Euston” Station.

In Chicago we have Devon Avenue, which unlike the English town (sorta, “DEV-in”) is pronounced in what I like to think of as a movie gangster notion of classy, “de-VON”.


#3

My favorite Texas/Boston joke is this one.

A Texan is walking around Boston and asks of a passerby “Where’s the Boston Public Library at?” The passerby lifts a finger and says “Here in Boston we don’t end our sentences with a preposition.” “Okay,” says the Texan, “where’s the Boston Public Library at, ASSHOLE.”


#4

Kinda sums up the current political situation in this country ; )

…and - gotta ask - how many other Texas/Boston jokes you got?


#5

That’s the one that’s fit to print! (I know a few more. . . my first wife lived in Boston a decade before she moved to Texas to join me in Austin in '90. . . so we came up with a few of our own).


#6

I never think of Austin as part of Texas, it too cool. I know there is some slogan about Austin staying weird or something? Between the annual music festival and Austin City Limits, I think it is the only place in Texas that I would like to visit.

My friend lived there for a year or so, and said it was too hot.


#7

I lived there 33 years, moving from Ohio when I was 25. I moved back to Ohio at 58.

When you leave it, you realize it DEFINITELY is part of Texas. It’s the only city in the state I could have lived in that long, it’s more cosmopolitan than others, but it’s definitely Texas! It’s not as hot as some other areas of Texas though.

My biggest complaint would be that the city became very expensive to live in over the decades, and very crowded. The city tripled in size the decades I lived there, and subjectively it seems the cost of living did as well.


#8

In the ‘70s we used to drive down to Ohio 1-2 times a year to go to what was then Earl Baltes’ Eldora Speedway. Tony Stewart owns it now. Saw some great racing, winged sprint cars. The days when Steve Kinser, Sammie Swindel, and Doug Wolfgang were the big names. I have a lot of fond memories at that place.


#9

SW Ohio. . I’ve never been there. I’m in the opposite corner, NE Ohio, out in the country far east of Cleveland. I used to hate it out here. . .lived twenty minutes away in a small town that still prides itself in “not moving forward with the times.” It’s sort of like a less pleasant Mayberry. I was the eldest son of the minister of the church on the town square. No fun. Now I live in wooded, hilly, sparsely housed neighborhood near the county seat, literally across the street from a huge state nature preserve and near a lake. What I would have hated as a teen and young adult, I love now as a retired man who loves peace and quiet.

When I returned four and a half years ago to Ohio to take care of my parents I was really afraid that the winters here would be unbearable. I find that I’m bearing them and enjoying them. . . though they last too long! At least it’s not too hot here!


#10

Jeff & lonson - Been to Austin a couple of times, and a neighbor’s brother, who is a successful fine and commercial artist lived there many years.* They refer to it as “a blue dot in the middle of a red state”. Not unlike a lot of college towns - some of which are also state capitals, like Madison, right Jeff?

I lived in Ann Arbor, MI for many years during and after college, which is truly a White Liberal Intellectual Theme Park ; ). The next large-ish town west of it, Jackson, is allegedly a northern center of the Klan. America!

Went for a long drive around the country (10.5k miles) with my girlfriend back then. We thought, “Wow, the rest of the country’s REALLY not like Ann Arbor!” : )

*(lonson - If you ever went to the Mean Eyed Cat bar, he painted the portrait of Johnny Cash)


#11

Plenty of redness within that blue dot, but yeah, it’s one of the biggest blue dots in the state. My family and I are like a tiny blue speck in the red region I find myself in now.


#12

Beef, yeah pretty much Madison and Milwaukee. I don’t get it, it is not like our rural areas are wealthy. Mostly just kind of stupid.


#13
badbeef said

*(lonson - If you ever went to the Mean Eyed Cat bar, he painted the portrait of Johnny Cash)


Never went there (or heard of it) but then I’m not a drinker and after I gave up playing in bands at the end of the 'eighties I rarely went out to bars. Wish I’d seen that portrait though.