Sonny rollins

hello all, been listening to alot of sonny as of late. any other similiar musicians you all like in this area. thanks

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Have you listened to Joe Henderson? Lush Life is a great recording.

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will check that out, thanks

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Hi @johnb33

Also, I would explore some of the wonderful performances / performers here:
Strictly Jazz Sounds - Music - PS Audio

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Too many to list, but definitely check out John Coltrane and Hank Mobley.

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Absolutely.

Art Pepper, Dexter Gordon and Lou Donaldson are three more pretty approachable hard bop saxophone players.

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I’d suggest investigating the work of Franco-American Barney Wilen. He was influenced by Rollins though a completely different saxophonist–and had a beautiful tone on tenor as well as soprano, alto and baritone–though he was predominantly a tenor saxophonist.

He was independently wealthy and did not need to tour or record to survive so his discography is more concise than Rollins’ and there are interesting gaps in his output, on top of that quite a bit of his material can be hard to find these days, but they are worth the search. My favorites are “New York Romance” and “Talisman.”

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Ooh, good call.

Wilen played with John Lewis and Sacha Distel on one of my favorite jazz albums of all time.

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A great way to explore some artists who are similar is to look at projects in which Sonny took part. The great thing about Jazz is how these guys just kept working and working, no matter whose name was billed at the top. The first album that comes to mind for me is:

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Joe Henderson had two outstaanding cds on Red Records, “The Standard Joe” and “An Evening with Joe Henderson”.

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You did not mention which Sonny Rollins albums you liked. Knowing helps with suggestions as Sonny’s sound changed over the years. Others have provided some very strong recommendations, what with early Coltrane (prior to his “New Thing” period), Hank Mobley, Joe Henderson, and Barney Wilen. There is also the mid-50’s Miles Davis period that featured Coltrane and Cannonball Adderly.

Some other saxophonists to consider, are Booker Ervin (more soulful), Gene Ammons (more soulful), Wayne Shorter (a fantastic composer as well as player, Julian “Cannonball” Adderly, Jackie McLean (a bit more angular), Art Pepper, and a personal favorite Sonny Stitt. These players venture mare away from Sonny’s big tone, but are worth seeking out IMO. Good luck with your Journey into Jazz.

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I knew I liked you for some reason… it must be the Stitt

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@weedeewop ain’t Stitt. lol

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I am playing Sonny Stitt now, great stuff. I like his control.

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Here are a pair of favorite Stitt, and yours?

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Tune-up is also a fav of mine. I probably go to it more than anything else he is on

And I love this 10" mostly because its really him figuring things out

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image

Big fan. Gene Ammons doesn’t get the recognition he deserves.

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Rollins is an interesting topic.

I just think loud here now and to make it clear, I adore several albums of him. Even saw him live.

What comes into my mind when characterizing is playing is…

…often catchy melodies or improvising
…relatively slow, clearly arranged playing compared to many others
…the impression one can hear him thinking/practicing his improvising
…a little uncertain in improvising
…big, unique, straight (I like) tone without reverb or vibrato like e.g. Coleman Hawkins or Ike Quebec
…in a great way unique to a degree unlike several other well regarded players at the time
…no innovator, no genius like Coltrane or Henderson, no master like Adderley, but with a strictly own style

I love and respect his playing more than of several others (e.g. Dexter Gordon) and less than again of others and I can’t name a similar player, he’s Rollins.

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Wow. I think Rollins was quite an improvisor his first two decades and I’d view him as twice the saxophonist Henderson was. But we’re all different.

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You summed up Sonny perfectly, as there is only one Sonny Rollins. However, there were many of his era worthy of repeated listens as others have mentioned.

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